From the Rabbi - March 2016 Print
It's been a few years since I was able to spend time in Israel and so I was delighted to be able to attend the conference of the Central Conference of American Rabbis in Israel this year. Since my last visit Israel has changed in many ways.  We tend to focus in the western news on the conflicts with Israel's neighbors and the Palestinians. While this is in fact a significant concern and a difficult reality for life in Israel, this focus masks the amazing changes and growth in Israeli society that are transforming Israel and making it even more vital and vibrant as a country and cultural center. Where once Israel was growing but struggling it now leads the world in many areas of technology, innovation and culture.  Tel Aviv and Jerusalem are world class cities in every possible way and building continues apace as both cities continue to grow and become more and more vibrant.

Changes are also happening in important areas of Israeli society. We visited a center in Jaffa for Arab-Jewish cooperation, working through educational and cultural programming to bring Israeli Jews and Israeli Arabs together and break down the barriers between the two peoples in Israeli society. And we spoke to people who are working for change within the Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) community, a sector of Israeli society that has been an obstacle to many changes in Israel and that is a source of frustration for the secular majority. We spoke to women who are working to change their position in Haredi society, including the first female Haredi kashrut inspector, and men who are struggling as they move from being engaged in permanent study to being part of the mainstream Israeli workforce. Both these changes are likely to bring about profound transformation in the Haredi community in the coming years.

But the highlight was attending a Knesset (parliamentary) committee meetingon Jewish pluralism within Israel. As many are aware, the orthodox have been entrenched as the religious authority for decades. This has created a significant stumbling block for acceptance of non-Orthodox streams of Judaism in Israel. That looks to be changing as in this committee one politician after an other, from almost every non-Orthodox party, testified to their commitment to religious pluralism in Israel as a central struggle for the soul of Israel in the coming years. This was a powerful moment and brought home the reality that, as we focus on the security of Israel from without, the future of Israel must also prioritize the growth of Reform and Conservative Judaism and the expansion of Jewish pluralism within Israel.  The contributions of non-Orthodox Judaism to Israeli society are already being felt and look to become more significant to Israel's future in the years to come.

                    Rabbi Ilan Emanuel